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Name WW I

Associated Records

Image of 1990.111 - 1990.111.01

1990.111 - 1990.111.01

Must Children die and Mothers Plead in Vain, Buy Liberty Bonds.

Image of 2001.071 - 2001.071.183

2001.071 - 2001.071.183

A. FLAG: 126th Field Artillary contructed in the pattern of an U.S. national Flag (No Writing). B. CORD AND TASSELS: Red, white, and blue wool twisted cord with silk binding. Red, white, and blue twist and then twisted together as a whole to give a braided affect. The cord is in good condition with minimal fraying of the wool cord in places. White wool is also becoming discolored from surface debris. No repairs or alterations are visible.The cord has a handmade knot toward the top. Cord ends with decorative tassels also red, white and blue. Wood base of tassel is wraped with the wool thread in a geometric design . The design is weaved on 2:2 ratio. Red coiled thread wraps around the

Image of 2001.071 - 2001.071.179

2001.071 - 2001.071.179

A. FLAG: 109th US Engineers HISTORY: The 109th US Engineers was drafted into Federal Service August 5, 1917, and was consolidated October 2, 1917, with Batteries A and B of teh Oregon Field Artillery, to form the 147th Field Artillery and assigned to the 41st Division. Demobilized May 23 1919 at Camp Dodge, Iowa. SOURCES: "Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment 109th Support Group," Lineage and Honors Information. 2012. Robert J. Dalessandro. www.history.army.mil/html/forcestruc/lineages/braces/spt/0109sptge.htm. "109th Engineer Group (Headquarters and Headquarters Company)," Military.Com Unit Pages. www.military.com/HomePage/UnitPageFullText.013476,712805,00.html Staff and a

Image of 2001.071 - 2001.071.182

2001.071 - 2001.071.182

A. FLAG: 126TH FIELD ARTILLERY Regimental Flag, World War 1. 1 layer, hand and machine stitch. Object no: 2001.71.182, tagged only HISTORY: The 126th Field Artillery was organized at Camp Cody, NM, on October 1, 1917. The regiment was formed originall of the 1st Field Artillery, IA NG. After a period of training, the 126th was moved overseas for action in September of 1918, and returned January 1919, demobilizing on January 20 at Camp Dodge in Iowa. SOURCES: Rinaldi, Richard A. The United States Army in World War I, Orders of Battle-Ground Units 1917-1919. 2005. Staff and accessory information is located in the Notes section.

Image of 2001.071 - 2001.071.172

2001.071 - 2001.071.172

A. FLAG: 109th US Engineers HISTORY: The 109th Us Engineers was drafted into Federal Service on August 5, 1917, and was consolidated October 2, 1917, with Batteries A and B of the Oregon Field Artillery to form the 147th Field Artillery and was thusly assigned to the 41st Division. The regiment was demobilized May 23, 1919, at Camp Dodge, Iowa. SOURCES: "Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment 109th Support Group," Lineage and Honors Information. 2012. Robert J. Dalessandro. www.history.army.mil/html/forcestruc/lineages/braces/spt/0109setge.htm Staff and accessory information is located in the Notes section.

Image of 2001.071 - 2001.071.165

2001.071 - 2001.071.165

A. FLAG: 609th US Engineers Staff and accessory information is located in the Notes section.

Image of 2001.071 - 2001.071.166

2001.071 - 2001.071.166

A. FLAG: 313rd Ammunition Train HISTORY: The 313rd Ammunition Train was organized at Camp Dodge Iowa in September of 1917 as a part of the 88th Division National Army. By September 9th the 88th Division arrived in France. Traning of the division continued at Semur (Cote d'Or). During the service of regiment, the men participate in engagements at Haute-Alsace, Meurth et Moselle, and Meuse. During the service of the 88th Division National Army there would be 27 battle deaths, 63 battle wounds, and 9 men captured as prisioners. In total about 15,000 men from Iowa and Minnesota would serve in the 88th Division National Army. SOURCES: "Order of Battle-American Forces-World War I," New Ri

Image of 2001.071 - 2001.071.167

2001.071 - 2001.071.167

A. FLAG: 209th Engineers HISTORY: Also known as the Sapper regiment, the 209th Engineers organized August of 1918 at Camp Forrest in Georgia, they formed part of the 9th Division. By September of 1918, the regiment had been moved to Camp Sheridan in Alabama, but as the war came to an end in November of the same year, there was no longer a need for the 209th, and in January of 1919, the regiment was completely demobilized. SOURCES: Rinaldi, Richard A. The United States Army in World War I - Ground Units, 1917-1919. 2005. p. 180. Staff and accessory information is located in the Notes section.

Image of 2001.071 - 2001.071.168

2001.071 - 2001.071.168

A. FLAG: 219th Field Battalion U.S. Signal Corps HISTORY: The Signal Corps was developed by Albert Myer during the Civil War to address the communication needs of the U.S. military. The original message relay system consisted of flag use by day and torches at night, technological developmentsof the 20th century would eventually include the radio, telophone and telograph as typical Signal Corps equipment. At it's peak the U.S. Signal Corps had 55,000 soldiers fighting during World War I. One of the many accomplishments of this branch of the military was to install around 38,000 miles of wire network throughout Europe to aid with communication. This flag belongs to the 219th Field Si

Image of 2001.071 - 2001.071.169

2001.071 - 2001.071.169

A. FLAG: 313rd HISTORY: The 313rd Ammunition Train was organized at Camp Dodge Iowa in September of 1917 and was a part of the 88th Division National Army. After a period of training, the 313rd arrived in France on the 9th of September where drilling continued at Semur (Cote d'Or). During their service, the men served at Haute-Alsace, Meurth et Moselle, and Meuse. The 88th Division woud suffer 27 battle deaths, 63 battle wounds, and 9 men taken as prisoners. In total the 88th Division would have 15,000 men serve from Iowa and Minnesota. The 313th Supply Train was a part of the 88th Division, also called the Clover Leaf Division due to the clover shape of their patch (made from putti

Image of 2001.071 - 2001.071.170

2001.071 - 2001.071.170

A. FLAG: US National, 48 stars and 13 stripes. HISTORY: The 48 star national United States flag was introduced on February 14 of 1912 after Arizona joined the Union. This version of the flag would represent the country for 47 years and flew during many wars and conflicts, including; the Bluff War, Banana Wars, World War I, the Russian Civil War, Bombardment of Samsun, the Posey War, World War II, the Korean War, and the Lebanon Crisis. In 1959, the 48 star flag would be replace by the 49 star flag after Alaska entered into the Union on January 3, 1959. Staff and accessory information is located in the Notes section.

Image of 2001.071 - 2001.071.171

2001.071 - 2001.071.171

A. FLAG: 302nd HISTORY: The 302nd regiment was organized on September 13, 1918 and formed half of the cavalry of the 16th Division Regular Army. By October 1, 1918, the entire division was undergoing extensive training in preparation to go overseas, however World War I ended on November 11, 1918, when an armistice was reached. Demobilization of the division commenced in February of 1919 and continued through March. SOURCES: "Order of Battle-American Forces-World War I," New River Notes. Grayson County Verginia, 2014. www.newrivernotes.com/topical_history_ww1_oob_american_forces.htm. Staff and accessory information is located in the Notes section.

Image of 2001.071 - 2001.071.177

2001.071 - 2001.071.177

A. FLAG: 133rd US Infantry HISTORY: The 133rd Infantry started out it's service as the 1st Battalion, first organized in May of 1861. The regiment fought thoughout the Civil War and was mustered out of service in July of 1865. When the Mexican Boarder Conflict arose in 1916, the regiment was called into action again and reorganized at the 2nd Volunteer Infantry, and fought until January 1917, when it was mustered out at Fort Des Moines in Iowa. When the United States entered World War I months later the men would again be called to action, drafted August 1917 and redesignated the 133rd Infantry of the 34th Infatry Division on October 1917. This flag would be used by the men of the 133rd

Image of 2001.071 - 2001.071.178

2001.071 - 2001.071.178

A. FLAG: 3rd Iowa Infantry HISTORY: The Third Iowa Infantry, also known as the 168th Infantry Regiment, traces it's lineage to the 4th Regiment, Iowa Volunteer Infantry of the Civil War. After multiple reorganizations, musterings and redesignations, the 3rd Infantry Regiment, Iowa National Guard was issued into servie on April 30, 1892. This flag was issued during World War I when the 3rd Iowa was a part of the 168th Infantry. The 168th was drafted into service in August 16 of 1917, redesignated the 168th Infantry Regiment of the 42nd Division, and was demobilized May 17, 1919, at Camp Dodge, Iowa. During service in World War I, the 168th fought at Champagn-Marne, Aisne-Marne, Lorrain

Image of 2001.071 - 2001.071.187

2001.071 - 2001.071.187

A. FLAG: 313rd Ammunition Train HISTORY: The 313rd Ammunition Train was organized at Camp Dodge Iowa in September of 1917, a branch of the 88th Division National Army. By September 9th, thee 88th Division NAtional Army had arrived in France and training of the division continued at Semur (Cote d'Or). During the service of the regiment, the men would participate in military endevers in Haute-Alsace, Meurth et Moselle, and Meuse. During the service of the 88th Division National Army there would be 27 battle deaths, 63 battle wounds, and 9 men taken prisoner. Of the 88th Division Regular Army there were 15,000 men from Iowa and Minnesota. SOURCES: "Order of Battle-American Forces-World

U 01397

shell, circa 1918. Broken shell found in a French village in the spring of 1918. The shells, when in good shape, were used on the French teams. This one was broken so it was discarded. Donor picked it up as a souvenir. Marshall M. Grabosch Collection.